(recently & unrecently) unpublished
 

1.

Die Kompositionsfuge in der nhd. Nominalkomposition. (MA thesis, 1974)

2.

Reconstructing the Concept of Subject. (1980)

3.

Object cases in Old English: What do they encode? (1981)

4.

Indirect duals, Part I. (1997)
[with Wolfgang Schellinger and Wilhelm Geuder]

5.

Oneness > indefiniteness > impreciseness in numbers and clock time > reciprocal disorder — in Bavarian, where else. (2002)

6.

The imperative of free choice: LOOK AND SEE WHAT can become an indefinite pronoun, too. (2002)

7.

How to agree in gender when you’ve got the wrong number: Low numerals in German(ic). (2002)

8.

Unanswered questions, wasted answers, loose leaves lost. (2003)

9.

Temperature talk: The basics. (2003)

10.

Deferential Attributive Possessives: What persons to use them with, what for, and what it may lead to. (2003)

11.

The prolongative, and what can hinder its grammaticalisation from loose, enumerative coordination. (2005)

12.

Early typology. (2005)

13.

Onset clusters in English: Simplified by rule or simple due to constraint? (2006)

14.

Affix suspension: The issues — to introduce the Affix Suspension Day. (2006)

15.

Affix suspension in echo-reduplication. (2007)

16.

Crackers. (2008)

17.

Morphological cumulation through phonological fusion? When PERSON is, and remains, separate from NUMBER. (2009)
[With Thomas Mayer, Tikaram Poudel, & Michael Spagnol]

18.

Linguistische Herausforderung: Verschiedenheit und Einheit der Sprachen. (2009)
[With Thomas Mayer & Frank Zimmerer]

19.

Pedestrian movement and language: Are grammars "emergent" like passing-by routines are? (2009)

20.

Adpositions from nouns, one way or another. (2009)

21.

Pertinacity and control. (2010)

22.

Time-stability in historical linguistics. (2012)

23.

Phrasierungsetüden. (2012)

24.

The re-distribution of suppletive stems: GEH- ‘go’ and STEH- ‘stand’ in Upper German dialects. (2013)

25.

Was machsten so? (2014)

26.

Genus im Gastgewerbe. (2015)

27.

Suppletion and the unity of the lexeme: German sein ‘to be’ and its second participle. (2016)

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